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Another object of these grain depots was to better control the price of grain, as in times of scarcity the local farmers charged most exorbitant prices, and also tried to prevent importation. On the arrival of Governor Macquarie's successor, Sir Thomas Brisbane, he called for a report on the public buildings of the colony. The milk returns sent by Andrew Thompson to him amounted to £60 0s. In the performance of this heroic work his health was seriously undermined. The foundation stone of a brick chapel, thirty-two feet by sixteen feet, was laid by the Rev. The first era of the history of Green Hills ends here, and the second stage in its history as Windsor begins. Extract from Government and General Order, dated 15th December, 1810, issued on the return of his Excellency Governor Macquarie from an extensive tour of inspection through the various districts where agriculture and the breeding of cattle have occupied the attention of settlers. We have quoted from this report, which was made in 1824, in the articles dealing with the Hospital, St. This is a fitting place to insert some further particulars as to the expenditure and the condition of certain other Windsor buildings:— Extracts from report of the value of the improvements which have taken place in the Public Buildings of Sydney, Parramatta, Windsor, Liverpool, and Campbelltown, from December 25th, 1822, to December 24th, 1823, and an expose of the present state of Public Buildings in New South Wales, by order of his Excellency Sir Thomas Brisbane, made by S. Harris, Architect, in 1824:— "Commissariat Offices, etc.—The office is a shed adjoining the end of the store, about eighty feet long, with two storeys." "The School Room, Old Hospital, Store, and Dr. Andrew Thompson also had a large store-keeping business at the Green Hills (Windsor), which, according to an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette, was taken over by Mr. This tour occupied the time from 6th November to 13th December, 1810:— "The frequent inundations of the rivers Hawkesbury and Nepean having been hitherto attended with the most calamitous effects, with regard to crops growing in their vicinity, and in consequence of most serious injury to the necessary subsistence of the colony, the Governor has deemed it expedient (in order to guard as far as human foresight can extend against the recurrence of such calamities), to erect certain townships in the most contiguous and eligible high grounds in the several districts subjected to those inundations for the purpose of rendering every possible accommodation and security to the settlers whose farms are exposed to the floods. It is probably the building still standing behind the police barracks. West's House are on a small scale, and the latter in a very dilapidated state." "Court House (with plan).—The building is so badly executed that tho' it has not been built two years, strong settlements are showing themselves in the walls and ceilings, and the interior accommodations are not at all adapted for the purpose intended, as the plan will show." "General Observations.—The author of this report, etc., etc., would advert to the expensive and insufficient plan pursued in making and repairing bridges—the one now re-building at Windsor is a proof of this assertion, for instead of throughing over a stout truss'd and framed wooden bridge of one arch (which from the bold situation of the banks might have been done at little more cost than what is now expended) the same principle is still followed as that at first introduced into the colon; by placing piles in the sides and bed of the river, which collect all the rubbish continually floating down, and in the event of a flood must unavoidably destroy every bridge so constructed." With regard to this report we may say that the Court House stands to-day strong and solid, and in constant use, and likely to last for many years to come. Matthew's Church, but it seems as strong and hard to-day as it was ninety years ago. On 10th August, 1829, the first Circuit Court was opened in Windsor by Judge Stephen. John Howe, in December, 1809, he having had on sale "Woollens, drapery, and all sorts of lines." Governor Macquarie landed in New South Wales 28th December, 1809, and took over the administration of affaire of the colony 1st January, 1810, from Lieutenant Governor Foveaux, and on 12th January, 1810, less than a fortnight after his arrival, Governor Macquarie made Andrew Thompson a Justice of the Peace, and appointed him as Chief Magistrate for the district of the Hawkesbury.

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Here the grain was stored under Government supervision. Philip's, Sydney, the body being removed in 1856 to Sandhills (Devonshire Street Cemetery), and in 1901 again removed to La Perouse, Botany. Ship Porpoise, Chief Magistrate throughout the Territory, and Aid de Camp to His Excellency Governor Bligh. Aged 27 years." Governor Bligh appointed Andrew Thompson as his bailiff or agent, and left the entire management of his farm in his hands. A small Wesleyan school was also taught by Edward Eagar (an emancipist lawyer), who also conducted divine service, and the same year, 1812, efforts were started to raise funds to build a chapel. Leigh arrived in the colony in the Hebe on 15th August, 1815. Samuel Marsden, Church of England Senior Chaplain, and they travelled to and from New Zealand together. Marsden had a large farm, portion of which extended right into the town of Windsor, and, knowing the desire for the erection of a chapel in Windsor, he presented Mr. Carvosso in 1820, and a house was bought for him, at a cost of two hundred and seventy pounds, known as the Mission House. He was in Sydney and Parramatta about the years 1822-5, and went to Hobart Town in May, 1825. A son, William, who was born in the Mission House, Windsor, died in England, in 1842.

The largest of these granaries stood on the present site of the School of Arts, and was used later as a military hospital. The inscription on the old tombstone reads:— "Sacred. In October, 1807, the Governor's stock consisted of forty-nine cows, and a number of sheep and pigs. During the big floods in 18, he took a very active part in rescuing people and property in danger. An appeal was made in 1816 to the Missionary Society in London for assistance to have this building erected. Leigh with the site on which the church now stands. Walter Lawry, of Parramatta, who arrived in New South Wales the same year, assisting. His father wrote a small biography of him, entitled, Attractive Piety, published in 1847.

The hospital has been remodelled, but the old main walls remain. A painting of Governor Macquarie was arranged for by the inhabitants of Windsor during his last visit to the town, and this was executed on his return to England, at a cost of £73 10s., and has hung in the Court House for the past ninety years. Barracks for one hundred convicts, with high brick wall. The high brick wall was lowered many years ago, and the barracks are those still seen in Bridge-Street. The original gaol was, we believe, built before Macquarie's time, but he had it enlarged about the year 1820. The land was sold by Laban White, on 5th July, 1838. "During the unfortunate disturbances (the arrest of Governor Bligh) which lately distracted this colony, he, whose death we now lament, held on the 'even tenor of his way,' and acquitted himself with mildness, moderation, and wisdom, and when the ruthless hand of death arrested his earthly career, he yielded with becoming fortitude, and left this world for a better, with humble and devout resignation, and an exemplary confidence in the mercies of his God." The following account of the funeral appeared in the Sydney Gazette, 3rd November, 1810:—In the mention of the death of A. John Macarthur, referring to his death, says: "It was an interposition of Providence to save the colony from utter ruin; never was there a more artful or a greater knave." In Bigge's report on the colony of New South Wales, made in 1822, he describes him as using his wealth so as to gain an influence with the small settlers on the Hawkesbury, and also as a man of loose moral character.

Governor Macquarie's reply, granting the citizens' request, is dated from Government House, Windsor, 4th January, 1822. The Cope family lived in the old cottage next the Presbyterian Church; the name appears in the Post Office Directory at 1835. Thompson, Esq., in the Gazette of last week, we should have added an account of the funeral, which took place on Friday Se'nnight (which means seven night), had we in time received it. Cartwright walked foremost, and was followed by Surgeons Mileham and Redfern, who had attended the deceased through the long and painful illness that brought to a conclusion an existence that had been well applied, Next followed the bier, attended by Captain Antill, A. But every fair-minded historian will see that a man who won the esteem of three successive Governors, as well as of all the leading residents of the district in which he lived, including the clergymen, and at whose funeral the whole district followed "their friend and patron" must agree that to call Andrew Thompson a bad citizen is a distortion of plain facts. Richard Fitzgerald arrived in the colony in the ship William and Ann, on the 28th August, 1791, when about nineteen years old. A fresh impetus was given to the church by the settlement of the Rev.

The same figures will be found in Waugh's Almanac for 1859. They were all local men, judging by their names: John Howe (leader), and his son-in-law George Loder, Andrew Howe, William Dargan, Philip Thornley, and Benjamin Singleton, after whom a northern town is named. It is interesting to notice the rapid development of the town of Windsor and district during the regime of Governor Macquarie. We have difficulty in locating the buildings numbered 6, 7, 8, and 9. A few years after, what was known as Cope's Farm was sold. Thompson was enabled to accumulate considerable property, and what was more valuable to him, to possess the confidence of some of the most distinguished characters of this country, the consciousness of which surmounted the private solicitude of re-visiting his native country, and led him rather to yield to the wish of passing the evening of his life where his manhood had been meritoriously exerted, than of returning to the land which gave him birth. Thompson's intrinsic good qualities were appreciated by his Excellency the present Governor (Macquarie), who soon after his arrival here was pleased to appoint him a Magistrate, for which situation Mr. This act, which restored him to that rank in Society which he had lost, made so deep an impression on his grateful heart as to induce him to bequeath to the Governor one-fourth of his Fortune.

During Governor Macquarie's regime (1810-22) Windsor was really a military settlement. Roads were made, magistrates and clergymen were appointed, churches and schools provided, public buildings erected, such as court house, gaol, military barracks, and hospital. One was made into a temporary chapel in 1810; downstairs a church, upstairs a school, and residence for the chaplain. Three-storey provision store and granary, bought from Andrew Thompson's estate. A large building stood on the site of the present School of Arts, known at the time as the old military hospital, and where soldiers were seen standing on guard. Another three-storey building stood behind the present School of Arts, and was the church in use until the opening of St. We can find no trace of this being used for any other purpose than that of a church and school, and we hesitate to name it No. It consisted of portions of the grants to Joseph Smallwood, and Thomas Riccaby, granted to them in 17. Thompson's natural good sense and a superior knowledge of the laws of his country peculiarly fitted him. This most useful and valuable Man closed his Earthly career on the 22nd Day of October, 1810, at His House at Windsor of which he was the principal Founder in the 37th year of his age, with[in] the Hope of [an] Eternal Life. The above inscription, having become weather-worn, was recut by Travis, of Richmond, about 1908, the coat having been collected in Windsor. Alexander Dandie, who retired on account of advancing years, in 1912, but he only lived a few months after his retirement, as he died on 17th December, 1912, aged seventy-two years. Another address, signed by eight hundred and thirty-three residents, was presented to Governor Bligh, expressive of their confidence in his administration in the year 1808. The old denominational school system came to an end by the erection and opening: of the present Public School in 1870. However, it is known that Governor King gave him forty gallons of spirits as a reward for some service rendered on May 27th, 1806. It is evident that Andrew Thompson did traffic pretty largely in spirits, for he was fined £100 in 1807 for so doing. Again, we find in 1800 a reference to the profits made on the sale of spirits by Andrew Thompson, the Governor's bailiff. vii., page 225.) He acquired a number of properties by purchase, including property in Baker Street and in Bridge Street, Windsor. Governor Bligh, and his son-in-law, Captain Putland, had farms near Pitt Town, where Bligh's oaks may still be seen. From this it appears that he obtained four hundred gallons of spirits which he retailed at a profit of twelve hundred pounds. His town residence in Sydney was in Macquarie Place. At another meeting to consider local grievances, John Bowman, Matthew Gibbons, and William Cummins were also present. Evans, William Baker, Thomas Arndell, Samuel Solomon and Andrew Thompson. The 73rd Regiment was stationed here in large barracks built about the year 1820, and still standing in Bridge Street. The main history of this period will be found elsewhere, in such articles as "The Hospital", "Churches", "Magistrates", "Early Schools", "Military", and specially in the separate articles dealing with the following pioneers:—Andrew Thompson, Richard Fitzgerald, Dr. These were well built, for four, if not five, Macquarie buildings are still in use—St. This was originally built of brick for a granary, one hundred and one feet by twenty-five feet, and twenty-three feet high, with three floors, and was completed in August, 1803. Thomas Riccaby died on the 15th May, 1818, aged 67 years. "Nor can we close this tribute to his memory without recurring to the important services Mr. From respect and esteem for the Memory of the deceased, this Monument is erected by LACHLAN MACQUARIE, GOVERNOR of New South Wales [A. The words in brackets appear in a copy of the inscription which was made about 1820, and is now in the Public Records' Office, London. At first the soldiers' and prisoners' barracks were in Thompson Square, near the Windsor wharf. Matthew's Church and rector, and the Court House being the best examples. The present gaol was built on the same site in 1859. Thompson's executors, and made into a hospital and grounds for fifty patients. This farm, part of which was formerly known as Catherine Farm, extended from the eastern boundary of the Presbyterian Church to a point near Fitzgerald Street, and included New Street, Catherine Street, Church Street, and Windsor Terrace. Thompson rendered this colony and many of his fellow creatures during the heavy and public distresses which the floods at the Hawkesbury produced among the settlers in that extensive district. Thompson's exertions on a late occasion were for two days and two nights unremittingly directed to the assistance of the sufferers, and we lament to add that in those offices of humanity he not only exposed himself to personal danger, but laid the foundation for that illness which has deprived the world of a valuable life. Before closing this sketch of Andrew Thompson we must mention that he had some bitter enemies in Sydney, though none locally, who painted him in a very different colour. Andrew's College, was next called and settled, in 1896, and he worked with great energy, having the church thoroughly renovated and repaired at considerable expense in 1897. "The Governor has accordingly marked out five separate townships, namely, one for the district of Green Hills, which he has called Windsor; one for Richmond Hill District, to be called Richmond; one for the Nelson District, to be called Pitt Town; one for Phillip District, to be called Wilberforce; and one for the Nepean or Evan District, to be called Castlereagh. The seasons at the period we write of were drier than formerly, the only floods of any consequence being in 16, until the late fifties, when floods again became frequent. Six acres of land enclosed, partly with a brick wall. About this time another prisoner was sentenced to seventy-five lashes for stealing a few oranges at Belmont. West watched the pulse while the flogging was publicly administered. Redfern, the assistant surgeon, and the officers of the 73rd Regiment.

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